READ ALL ABOUT IT

STEM Related Books Sponsored by

LockheedMartin logo.png

Becoming an Astronaut!

Picture3 may and june stem.jpg

"If you decide to go to the moon," writes Faith McNulty, "read this book first. It will tell you how to get there and what to do after you land. The most important part tells you how to get home. Written in the second person, the text allows the reader to participate in every aspect of the journey, from packing ("don't forget your diary and plenty of food") to liftoff (at first you'll feel heavy; don't worry") to traveling through space (where "the moon glows like a pearl in the black, black sky"). The reader lands at the Sea of Tranquility, the site of the first lunar landing.”

 

– Grades Preschool to 1st –

Brevard County Public Library link for this book:

Picture2 may and june stem.jpg

“Astronaut Mark Kelly flew with "mice-tronauts" on his first spaceflight aboard space shuttle Endeavour in 2001. Mousetronaut tells the story of a small mouse that wants nothing more than to travel to outer space. The little mouse works as hard as the bigger mice to show readiness for the mission . . . and is chosen for the flight While in space, the astronauts are busy with their mission when disaster strikes--and only the smallest member of the crew can save the day. With lively illustrations by award-winning artist C. F. Payne, Mousetronaut is a charming tale of perseverance, courage, and the importance of the small.”

– Grades Preschool to 3rd –

 

Brevard County Public Library link for this book:

Picture4 may and june stem.jpg

“How many kids aspire to become an astronaut one day? Wouldn't it be great to float in space and do neat experiments? But before all the "fun" begins, it takes an incredible amount of hard work to prepare oneself for the ride of a lifetime. Before they are sent to space, astronauts have to go through spacecraft systems training, wilderness training, underwater training, roller coaster-like flight training, and teamwork training, not to mention science, technology, medical, engineering, and math training. Training for flight also depends on being prepared physically, mentally, and emotionally, having the right attitude and learning to deal with problems calmly. With its first-hand photos and amusing illustrations, Go for Lift Off is the go-to book for aspiring astronauts.”

– Grades 2nd to 5th –

 

Brevard County Public Library link for this book:

FEATURED BOOK

Picture1 may and june stem.jpg

Rolling Readers Space Coast, Inc. Commentary:
 

Have you ever found yourself gazing up at the twinkling, starry night sky, dreaming about the possibilities of one day exploring the UNIVERSE? With our country’s recent return to human spaceflight this year, perhaps you have seen astronauts from Crew 1 or Crew 2 working on the International Space Station, or overheard NASA's plans to send the first man and woman back to the Moon by 2024, or maybe you've been following the ongoing exploration of Mars and want to prepare for that trip one day… Inspiration from all around has motivated you, and now you know you want to become an astronaut! Did you know that the term “astronaut” is derived from the Greek word meaning “space sailor?” Seeing Earth from space, exploring the wonders of deep space, experiencing zero gravity, and studying the planets is an amazing opportunity that astronauts have to educate, prepare, and train for. Becoming an astronaut doesn’t have to be a childhood fantasy… So how do you get there, and what can you do to make it possible? Start with STEM. According to NASA, attain a master's degree in a STEM related field, including engineering, biological science, physical science, computer science, or mathematics, from an accredited institution and you will be well on your way! We chose to highlight Mae Among the Stars, by Roda Ahmed, as our S.T.E.M. book for May and June. Working on an assignment for school, Mae was pondering the question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”, when she told her parents that she wanted to see Earth from “out there!” as she directed their attention to the sky above their heads. Aspiring to one day be an astronaut, Mae’s curiosity, intelligence, and determination, matched with her parents' encouraging words, paved the way for her incredible success at NASA as the first African American woman to travel in space. While becoming a member of an exclusive group of individuals who explore the universe is no easy feat, do not give up on your dreams… “Because, if you dream it, believe in it, and work hard for it, anything is possible.”

 

 

EDITORIAL REVIEW

 

School Library Journal © Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. - Gr K to Gr 2
 

K-Gr 2-Born in Alabama, Mae Jemison dreamed of going to space. When she grew up, she attained a degree in chemical engineering before finishing medical school in the 1980s. After a stint in the Peace Corps, Jemison wasn't content with just being an engineer or doctor-she satisfied her love of the stars by becoming an astronaut-the first African American female astronaut and the first African American woman in space. Ahmed and Burrington have created a love letter to Jemison with this appealing picture book biography. The recurring line, "If you can dream it, if you believe in it, and work hard for it, anything is possible" is a chorus sure to resonate with children. The emphasis on Jemison's lifelong passion for space science will inspire readers to have confidence in the trajectory of their own interests. Burrington's bright, kid-friendly illustrations were created with ink and Adobe Photoshop. An epilogue provides the dates and details of Jemison's life and career. VERDICT A starry addition to picture book biography collections.-Deidre -Winterhalter, Oak Park Public Library, IL © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

 

Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission. Gr K to Gr 3

 

Aqueous watercolor backgrounds and sweet, round-faced figures illustrate this empowering account of the childhood of Mae Jemison, the first black woman in space. As a child, Mae dreams big, telling anyone who'll listen (and even some who won't) that she wants to be an astronaut. Her white teacher and classmates are cruelly dismissive, but her parents are always encouraging, telling her, if you believe it and work hard for it, anything is possible. That exhortation becomes a mantra, and after years of hard work, Mae makes good on her aspirations and waves to her parents from her spaceship. Ahmed focuses primarily on Mae's childhood dreams of space, skipping over the hard work she did to finally achieve her goal, but a closing note fills in some details about Jemison's groundbreaking career. Burrington's cute, playful paintings match the dreamy focus of the story, particularly her star-splattered nighttime scenes. Though kids looking for a meatier account of Jemison's work might be disappointed, the inspirational tone will strike the right note for those just learning about the astronaut.--Hunter, Sarah Copyright 2018 Booklist

 

Kirkus Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

 

Pioneering African-American astronaut Mae Jemison's childhood love of space and supportive parents led to her illustrious career. Little Mae's pastoral childhood home is presented in warm yellows, blues, and greens, visually establishing the atmosphere promoted by her loving parents, who encourage her dreams. When Mae's school assignment asks her to write about what she wants to be when she grows up, Mae responds that she wants to see Earth from space. Her parents tell her she must become an astronaut to do that, and when Mae asks if they think she can, their response weaves its way throughout the narrative: "Of course you can. If you can dream it, if you believe it and work hard for it, anything is possible." Thus begins Mae's obsession with space: reading about space, creating homemade astronaut costumes and spaceships, and drawing spacescapes. But when she shares her dreams in school, her white teacher discourages her, and her mostly white classmates laugh. Mae is crestfallen, her despondency captured with deceptively simple lines and a blue wash. Her dismay is short-lived, as she is buoyed up by her parents' continued support and encouragement. Uplifted, Mae promises to wave to her parents from space one day and she does just that, as the first African-American astronaut. An enchanting, inspirational account of Jemison's early life that illustrates the importance of encouraging and supporting children's dreams. Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

 

Brevard County Library link to locate this book: 

March-April

Rainbows, Refraction, and Reflection 

FEATURED BOOK

Picture1_march.jpg

Everything is brighter and magical with rainbows… Even a rainy day! Have you ever wondered if there was a pot of gold at the end or just how the colors red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet appear in that arc of delightfulness?!? Spring is the perfect time to explore how the ‘rain’ gets in rainbows! STEM is all around us every day, and emerges naturally just like rainbows in the sky! A powerful illustration of reflection, refraction, and dispersion of light, rainbows are formed when light shines through water. As the sun enters, or shines through, a raindrop the light slows down and bends as it goes from air to denser water. As the light bends it is reflected off the inside of the raindrop, like a reflection in a mirror, and separates into its component wavelengths--or colors causing all of the amazing rainbows that you see! But in order to see the reflection of the rainbow in the sky, we have to look towards the rain with our backs to the sun! Have you ever noticed that the sun is always behind you when you face a rainbow?!? Rainbows normally appear from the rain, but they can happen wherever light is being bent inside of water droplets (raindrops, mist, fog, spray, and dew) as they act like tiny prisms. Actually, what makes rainbows so special is that no two people ever see the same exact thing. Everyone sees something different because it all depends on how the light is being bent and reflected back to you… We chose to highlight The Rainbow and You, by Edwin C. Krupp, as our S.T.E.M. book for March and April! Join rainbow expert Roy G. Biv (mnemonic device, Roy G. Biv: Red, Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue, Indigo, Violet), a guide who looks like a leprechaun, as he explains and explores the ins and outs of rainbows, their formations, and even helps you make a rainbow of your own! Is there really a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow? Does a rainbow have an end?!?

 

 

EDITORIAL REVIEW

 

School Library Journal © Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. - Gr 2 to Gr 5
 

Through readable text and dazzling illustrations, the Krupps explore this meteorological phenomenon. As in The Big Dipper and You (Morrow, 1999) and The Moon and You (Macmillan, 1993), the highly pictorial format belies a scientifically oriented text. Using Roy G. Biv (a leprechaun-like elf in yellow slicker, blue overalls, rainbow-colored boots, and with matching whiskers) as a helpmate, the author includes a brief assortment of global rainbow myths and legends as well as an explanation of the mechanics of the physics behind the glowing arc of colors. The clear text gives clues to searching for rainbows and rainbow colors in unlikely places, and instructs readers to make scientific observations when they occur. Isaac Newton's experiments with prisms are included, but earlier experiments by Theodoric of Freiburg are not; nor are ghostly moonbows, rare fogbows, and ground-hugging dewbows. Still, this is a brilliantly rainbow-hued, tightly focused investigation of these seemingly miraculous spectacles that inspire wonder and delight in all who view them. Aficionados should also check out Stephen Kramer's intriguing Theodoric's Rainbow (Scientific American, 1995).-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc.

 

Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission. Gr 2 to Gr 3

 

The Krupps offer a delightful picture-book study of rainbows without undercutting the magic or the beauty of the phenomenon. Roy G. Biv (his name is a mnemonic for the rainbow's colors--red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, violet), a gnome-like fellow with rainbow socks and a rainbow beard, helps guide youngsters through the facts. The Krupps mention rainbow stories from various cultures, from the rainbow bridge of the Viking Asgard to the rainbow serpent of the Australian Dreamtime. Isaac Newton's explication of the rainbow, the science behind double rainbows (ever notice that the order of the colors is reversed in the outer rainbow?), and the way to make a rainbow using a garden hose are just some of the intriguing tidbits the Krupps supply in engaging and effortless style. They also provide a handy checklist of questions eager students of rainbows may want to investigate. --GraceAnne A. DeCandido

 

Kirkus Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

 

The enthusiasm that lights up the Krupps' previous science books (The Moon and You, 1993, etc.) shines in this busy disquisition on rainbows. The author discusses the conditions (unique to Earth) necessary for rainbows; what exactly we are seeing in the lawn sprinkler or up in the clearing sky; Isaac Newton's demonstration that the rainbow's colors are contained in natural light; and even some of the rainbows in mythology. The illustrator creates a multi-hued leprechaun dubbed with the old mnemonic "Roy G. Biv" to guard that nonexistent pot of gold, and to act as a sort of teacher's assistant. Skipping as it does over so much territory, this refreshing break from the many conventional treatments of the subject is more a consciousness-raiser than a book of specific facts or projects for young experimenters. (Picture book/nonfiction. 6-8) Copyright ©Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

 

Brevard County Library link to locate this book: 

Picture2_march.jpg

“Ned loves rainbows. He even wears rainbow pyjamas One rainy day a beautiful rainbow appears. Ned runs up and tries to reach the colours but they are too high for him. He is so sad, until the next day he finds a painted rainbow of his very own on his bedroom wall.”

 

– Grades Preschool to 1st –

Brevard County Public Library link for this book:

Picture3_march.jpg

“When a glorious, colorful rainbow spreads across the sky after a storm, a girl wonders what might be at the end? Setting out, she gathers traveling companions—a cat, a turtle, a horse. Everyone is excited! But even though the rainbow disappears before they reach the end, it's all right—they found something even better… new friends!”

– Grades Preschool to 3rd –

 

Brevard County Public Library link for this book:

Picture4_march.jpg

“A small boy imagines what it would be like to have his own rainbow to play with.”

– Grades Preschool to 1st –

 

Brevard County Public Library link for this book:

Picture5_march.jpg

“Why do Annie and Mike see rainbows dancing on the dining room wall? When rainbows mysteriously appear on the wall, Annie and Mike try to find out where they come from.”

– Grades 2nd to 3rd – 

Brevard County Public Library link for this book:

January- February

Growth Mindset 

FEATURED BOOK

January Picture1.jpg

EDITORIAL REVIEW

 

From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

 

Gr. K-Gr. 2. “Simplicity itself, like the dot in the title, this small book carries a big message. Vashti doesn't like her art class. She can't draw. So when her teacher tells her just to make a mark, Vashti belligerently hands in her paper with a single dot. But what a wise teacher Vashti has. She makes Vashti sign the paper, and then she frames it. Seeing her work on the wall encourages Vashti to do better, and she takes out her watercolors and begins experimenting with all sorts of dots. At a school show, her dots are a hit, and when a little boy tells her he can't draw, she invites him to make his own mark. The squiggle he puts down on paper gets him off and running. The pen-and-ink drawings accented with splotches of colorful circles aren't quite as minimalist as Vashti's work, but they reflect the same sparseness and possibility. Art teachers might consider reading this at the beginning of each semester to quell the idea, ("I can't draw.").” - Ilene Cooper
 

From School Library Journal – Gr Preschool to Gr 4

 

“Just make a mark and see where it takes you." This sage advice, offered by her intuitive, intelligent teacher, sets our young heroine on a journey of self-expression, artistic experimentation, and success. First pictured as being enveloped by a blue-and-gray miasma of discouragement and dejection, Vashti seems beaten by the blank paper before her. It is her defeatist declaration, "I just CAN'T draw," that evokes her teacher's sensitive suggestion. Once the child takes that very first stab at art, winningly and economically dramatized by Reynolds's fluid pen-and-ink, watercolor, and tea image of Vashti swooping down upon that vacant paper in a burst of red-orange energy, there's no stopping her. Honoring effort and overcoming convention are the themes here. Everything about this little gem, from its unusual trim size to the author's hand-lettered text, from the dot-shaped cocoons of carefully chosen color that embrace each vignette of Vashti to her inventive negative-space masterpiece, speaks to them. Best of all, with her accomplishment comes an invaluable bonus: the ability and the willingness to encourage and embolden others. With art that seems perfectly suited to the mood and the message of the text, Reynolds inspires with a gentle and generous mantra: (“Just make a mark.”)”-Kathy Krasniewicz, Perrot Library, Greenwich, CT Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

 

Brevard County Library link to locate this book: 

January Picture2.jpg

“Melia is scientific and loves to create things in her backyard laboratory, but something is missing. Her inventions just aren't quite right. Enter Jo, her new friend with an artistic spirit. When you add the Arts to Sciences, something magical happens!”


– Grades Preschool to 3rd – 

Brevard County Public Library link for this book:

January Picture3.jpg

“What do you do with an idea? Especially an idea that's different, or daring, or a little wild? This is the story of one brilliant idea and the child who helps to bring it into the world. It's a story for anyone, at any age, who's ever had an idea that seemed too big, too odd, and too difficult. It's a story to inspire you to welcome that idea, to give it space to grow, and to see what happens next.”

 

What Do You Do With an Idea? Has won several awards, including the Independent Publisher's Book Gold Award, the Washington State Book Award, and the Moonbeam Children's Book Award.

 

– Grades 1st to 2nd –

 

Brevard County Public Library link for this book:

January Picture4.jpg

“Meet Beatrice Bottomwell: a nine-year-old girl who has never (not once!) made a mistake. She never forgets her math homework, she never wears mismatched socks, and she ALWAYS wins the yearly talent show at school. In fact, Beatrice holds the record of perfection in her hometown, where she is known as The Girl Who Never Makes Mistakes. Life for Beatrice is sailing along pretty smoothly until she does the unthinkable-she makes her first mistake. And in a very public way!”

 

– Grades Kindergarten to 3rd –

 

Brevard County Public Library link for this book:

January Picture5.jpg

“Zoom meets Beautiful Oops in this memorable picture book debut about the creative process, and the way in which "mistakes" can blossom into inspiration. One eye was bigger than the other. That was a mistake. The weird frog-cat-cow thing? It made an excellent bush. And the inky smudges... they look as if they were always meant to be leaves floating gently across the sky. As one artist incorporates accidental splotches, spots, and misshapen things into her art, she transforms her piece in quirky and unexpected ways, taking readers on a journey through her process. Told in minimal, playful text, this story shows readers that even the biggest "mistakes" can be the source of the brightest ideas--and that, at the end of the day, we are all works in progress, too. Fans of Peter Reynolds's Ish and Patrick McDonnell's A Perfectly Messed-Up Story will love the funny, poignant, completely unique storytelling of The Book of Mistakes.”

 

– Grades Preschool to 3rd –

 

Brevard County Public Library link for this book:

RRSC LOGO blue bkgd-f.png